Suggested Readings

Here is a page for articles and reports relevant to NGLC goals:

 

Joshua Kim interview with Lucretia Witte, “A Student’s Views,” Inside Higher Ed: BlogU (April 12, 2010).
<http://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/technology_and_learning/a_student_s_views
>
The qualitative aspects of this student’s research are a nice complement to larger surveys like the ECAR report on undergrad students and IT, NSSE, etc.  (posted by Andrew)

ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 2010 (ID:ERS1006)
http://www.educause.edu/library/ERS1006

National Survey of Student Engagement (NSEE)
http://www.nsse.iub.edu/

NSSE Selected Results: STEM Students and Teaching and Learning Technologies
http://nsse.iub.edu/NSSE_2009_Results/pdf/NSSE_AR_2009.pdf#page=19

RE-IMAGINING CALIFORNIA HIGHER EDUCATION by John Aubrey Douglass. CSHE.14.10 (October 2010) (Research and Occasional Papers Series). PDF document (1067 kB)
<http://cshe.berkeley.edu/publications/docs/ROPS.Douglass.ReImaginingCalHE.10.25.10.pdf>

Ben Miller and Phuong Ly, “College Dropout Factories.” Washington Monthly College Guide (September,2010).
http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/college_guide/feature/college_dropout_factories.php?page=all
A poignant article that highlights the need for investments like NGLC.

The Path Forward: The Future of Graduate Education in the United States (2010). A landmark report by the Commission on the Future of Graduate Education, a joint initiative between the Council of Graduate Schools and Educational Testing Service.
<http://www.fgereport.org/rsc/pdf/CFGE_report.pdf>
Why is a report about graduate education relevant to the lower-division (and K-12) goals of NGLC?  Because college completion is essential to the talent pipeline for research institutions like the UO, and for the nation:
…the global competitiveness of the United States and capacity for innovation hinges fundamentally on a strong system of graduate education.
…Without increases in high school graduation rates, increases in the number of Americans transitioning to college cannot occur, and without increases in degree recipients at the undergraduate level, the pool of graduate school applicants cannot be increased.


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